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SRA PUBLIC LIABILITY INSURANCE
The SRA policy covers the amateur activities of target and clay pigeon shooting, rough shooting, deer stalking, driven shooting, archery, pest control, wildfowling, game shooting and re-enactment groups; re-enactment includes air-soft skirmish and living history...
The SRA policy covers the amateur activities of target and clay pigeon shooting, rough shooting, deer stalking, driven shooting, archery, pest control, wildfowling, game shooting and re-enactment groups; re-enactment includes air-soft skirmish and living history. The insurance also includes the humane destruction of animals on or near public highways at the request of the police or National Trust, and also covers non-SRA members trying out archery under the supervision of SRA members.
The cover is for claims against members from third parties for losses or injuries (up to £10 million per claim) caused by the member’s negligence. The claim could be against an individual, a group, or an individual within a group activity, as member-to-member cover is included. Contact the SRA Secretary if a claim is likely to arise.
The key to interpreting public liability insurance is the word “negligence”; accidents will happen, but liability is determined by consideration of who (if anyone) was negligent and thus caused injury to another party or damage to their property. If you shoot a sitting magpie out of a tree and the same shot also knocks an owl out of another tree 30 feet beyond, the owl would have a claim for negligence against you, as would a courting couple on the hillock behind the deer you just shot. Claims can arise in all sorts of circumstances; if you’re in a swordfight re-enactment and your blade tip flies off into the crowd, you may hear from the person who caught it and there may be a claim. Likewise if your gun blows up on the range, other members of your club could be injured by the consequent pieces of shrapnel.
Claims on this policy have been few and far between, which is as it should be, because we insure against the unforeseen and the unexpected, and standards in clubs and groups are very high. In a recent claim, an overshoot at a harvest fox damaged a combine harvester, while another fox featured in an overshoot that killed an innocently-bystanding calf.
The Daily Sport reported on 26 July 2006 that a man dressed in full armour was killed by lightning striking his lance at an event in Sweden; that would be a “personal injury”, there being no third party to sue. Events like these are outside the ambit of this policy.
Gamekeepers are amateur pest controllers and thus benefit from this insurance if they are members. Group members in a re-enactment are amateurs if they are not being paid an individual appearance fee. The club can receive a fee for the group’s services, but individuals within the group can be reimbursed only for their actual expenses.
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